Thursday, July 30, 2015

Apple Seeds Second iOS 8.4.1 Beta to Developers

Apple today seeded the second beta of iOS 8.4.1 to registered developers for testing purposes, just over two weeks after releasing the first iOS 8.4.1 beta and a month after launching iOS 8.4 with the new Apple Music service. 


Today's beta, build 12H318, is available via an over the air update and it can also be downloaded from the Apple Developer Center. 

No outward facing changes were discovered in the first iOS 8.4.1 beta, and it's a .1 update, so it's likely that it includes only minor bug fixes, security enhancements, and performance improvements designed to prepare the update for its upcoming retirement. 

iOS 8.4.1 may be one of the last updates to iOS 8 as Apple is working on its successor, iOS 9. iOS 9 builds on many of the features introduced with iOS 8 and adds new content and underlying performance improvements. iOS 9 is currently in beta testing and will be released in the fall.

iPhone 6s Parts Leak as Production Begins [Photos]

Apple has reportedly Begun production of the next generation iPhone and we're now seeing the first part photos leak online.



As you can see in the photo below, the power, volume, camera and LED flash, have allegedly been combined into one new flex cable.

In addition, leaked rings reveal the iPhone 6s will still have a protruding camera and a leaked home button confirms the gold color option.



Earlier this month, a leaked logic board revealed a new NFC chip, 16Gb of storage, and a reduction in the number of components used.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

SBHTML Battery+Weather

battery+ weather
battery+ weather2
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A ‚Read me‘ file with instructions is included.

Apple Releases Third Public Beta of OS X El Capitan 10.11

Apple today released a third beta of OS X El Capitan 10.11 to public beta testers. The releases follows the fifth beta release to developers on Monday.

Public beta testers can update their OS via the Mac App Store. If you haven't already joined the Apple Beta Software Program, you can do so here.


AT&T Urges FCC to Drop $100 Million Fine, Says Data Throttling Doesn't Harm Customers

Last month the United States Federal Communications Commission announced that it would fine AT&T $100 million for misleading customers about its unlimited data plans and not adequately warning customers about throttling their data speeds. AT&T has since responded, arguing that data throttling doesn't harm customers, the company is being prejudged and that its First Amendment rights are being violated in a response first found by The Hill (via Ars Technica). 
ATT Logo
The Commission’s findings that consumers and competition were harmed are devoid of factual support and wholly implausible. Its “moderate” forfeiture penalty of $100 million is plucked out of thin air, and the injunctive sanctions it proposes are beyond the Commission’s authority. Both, moreover, reflect an unseemly effort to coerce settlement. And the NAL and the related press campaign confirm that the agency has already prejudged AT&T’s liability, abandoning any pretext that the Commission remains an impartial arbiter of the case.
AT&T, who wants the FCC to drop the fine, claims that it has made all the required disclosures to customers, pointing out that its Unlimited Data Plan customers were more likely to renew their contracts than non-Unlimited Data Plan customers. Additionally, the telecommunications company argued the FCC would be outside of its authority in both imposing the fine and making other requests because the statute of limitations on the case has passed. 

Lastly, AT&T argued that the FCC has no authority to order the company to inform its customers that it violated the Transparency Rule in not telling them about speed changes when throttling data because the statement would both be untrue and a violation of AT&T's First Amendment rights. 



AT&T ceased selling Unlimited Data Plans years ago but continues to have customers grandfathered to its Unlimited Data Plans. Previously, the company throttled its Unlimited Data Plan customers once they exceeded 5 GB of LTE data, but in May the company changed its policy to only throttle customers when connected to a cell tower experiencing network congestion.